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Viva la vide (live life)

Viva la vide (live life)

A lot of people do not get why I am so obsessed with the American education system. Besides the fact that it is very rigorous (6 years to complete a PhD), the thing that I learned the most from my time in Pittsburgh that I carry until today is WHAT IT MEANS TO BE AN EDUCATOR. Before I went to Pittsburgh, I was taught under Malaysia’s system for 13 years (including for my pre-Uni, because let’s face it, those are MALAYSIAN teachers). What is it that I meant by the ‘Malaysian education system’? They are meant to PUNISH rather than to REWARD students. I brought this issue up during my second BTN (Biro Tata Negara). The facilitator looked me in the eyes and said, “Malaysian students are not as mature as American students.”

What am I talking about specifically? Let’s put it this way. I was a foreign student thrown into the American system for the first time; therefore, 1) I am NOT a native English speaker, and 2) I had been taught in a different system my whole life. However, I graduated from Pittsburgh with a 3.99 CGPA (I only got one A- and that was a systematic issue as no student got high marks in that class). My point? As much as I am a hard-worker, there is no doubt in my mind that the lecturers chose to reward rather than to punish me. They saw my efforts and they graded me based on that. Me being a kiasu student, I took it a step further by making sure I met each of my lecturer so that he or she can put a face behind the name. They also appreciated my effort to improve by seeking their assistance. I did the same thing at the LSE.

Speaking of the LSE, even though I did not graduate with distinction, I GRADUATED from the LSE with merit. Yes, it was more stringent, and being at the LSE reminded me a lot of Malaysia’s education system (exam-based). Nevertheless, because I put in so much effort, I got praised by a few of my lecturers in class. My LSE lecturers. They are world-class academicians. Why? Because they are not interested in nit-picking my mistakes. They wanted to EDUCATE me. That is my point. I learned what it means to be an educator. An educator is someone who motivates his or her students to continue this beautiful life-long journey of learning. In fact, I always tell my students that I am a political science student just like them. Once you are an academician, you become a life-long student.

I like to think that I am re-paying my debt by exercising the same principle to my students. Case-in point: from my very short experience as a lecturer, I was able to convince two of my students from different departments to minor in political science. They got interested in the subject. How did I do it? I pointed out their efforts and I downplayed their shortcomings. I have to take into consideration the fact that they are not political science majors, and they had ZERO interest in politics at the start of semester (MANY of them admitted to me that they got interested in politics after taking my class). I like to give them the time and space to get acquainted with the subject and to improve, because that was what my lecturers in Pittsburgh did to me. With their guidance, I graduated summa cum laude and among the top 2% of my class. I want the same thing for my students.

So what is wrong with the Malaysian education system? Malaysian educators are here to show you how horrible you are and not how you can improve. There is a difference between the two. My final words: go critique your own academic work. (That’s my civil way of saying, “Go *bleep* your *bleep*”). Mic-drop.

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